The founding National Association of Morris and Sword Dance Clubs

Welcome to the Morris Ring

  • Christopher Todd's brilliant pastiche of Morris On
  • Foot Up from Ravensbourne MM
  • Thaxted Centenary Meeting 2011. Photograph by Mike Stevens.
  • Moulton MM at Thaxted 2014 by John Savill
  • Saddleworth MM process across Tower Bridge

The Morris Ring was formed in 1934 and currently is an association of some 180 morris, sword and mummers clubs and teams keeping our wonderful traditions alive.

At our 2018 Annual Representatives Meeting there was overwhelming support for a proposal to enable any morris team, whatever its gender make up, to become a member of The Morris Ring if they support the founding principles of the organisation:

“The object of the Morris Ring shall be to encourage the performance of the Morris, to maintain its traditions and to preserve its history; to bring into contact all the Morris Clubs or Teams. The purpose of the Morris Ring is not to replace or supersede the existing organisations, but to sub-serve them. The Clubs shall in all respects retain their independence.”

Now any established Club or Team which meets regularly to enjoy Morris or Sword Dancing or Mumming, and endeavours to uphold the standards and dignity of the Morris, is eligible for Membership of the Morris Ring.

Full details of our membership benefits and process can be found on the A guide to Membership page.

You will find all you need to know about our rich historyofficers and contactsmember sidesmusic,  and Ring events within these pages ... and much, much more. Take time to browse our newsletters and announcements, publications and reports..

Looking for a morris side near you?  Try our Find a Side page.

If you really want to have a good browse through all the content, see our Site Map!

For sides' news and updates, many more photos and chat, visit our more informal Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/TheMorrisRing.

And finally, if you want to have the latest news and important updates sent direct to you, become a Subscriber.

webeditor [at] themorrisring [dot] org (Peter de Courcy - Web Editor)

Latest news

News

News and views from elsewhere in the Morris Ring world

Next Tuesday we at Screen Archive South East, in collaboration with our partners at the West Sussex Record Office, will make available a variety of archives, which we think will greatly interest you and your members. Through our portal, called West Sussex Unwrapped, we will present a smashing film that features an epic festival of Morris Dancing through the sleepy streets of Horsham in 1989, while the West Sussex Record Office blog will feature records, photos and historical information about Morris Dancing in West Sussex.

Any solid full face coloured make up which could be taken by an observer as likely to imitate or parody a skin colour different from your own.  ‘Make up’ is used here as a general term to mean any kind of stage make up, face paint, soot, charcoal, or similar.

This matter has been under review for some years, with statements and advice to sides being issued by successive squires.

These have increasingly asked sides to consider their continued use of such face make up, the effect it has on their audience, the safety of their side members, and what alternatives could be used to achieve the same effect.  Many member sides have heeded this advice and stopped using it.

The issue has however remained under constant review by the officers because although it has a complex and uncertain history, it is perceived by some as racist.

A statement from the Morris Ring in conjunction with our fellow morris organisations:

The Joint Morris Organisations (JMO) wholly condemns and disassociates themselves from the sentiments expressed in an article recently published on a nationalist website. We hope the entire morris community would join us in rejecting the divisive narrative put forward by this article. 

 Morris is a unique cultural tradition of which we should be rightly proud. However, we will never support a divisive narrative which seeks to put our tradition beyond certain groups.